Resistance training is medicine: effects of strength training on health

Resistance training is medicine: effects of strength training on health

Inactive adults experience a 3% to 8% loss of muscle mass per decade, accompanied by resting metabolic rate reduction and fat accumulation. Ten weeks of resistance training may increase lean weight by 1.4 kg, increase resting metabolic rate by 7%, and reduce fat weight by 1.8 kg. Benefits of resistance training include improved physical performance, movement control, walking speed, functional independence, cognitive abilities, and self-esteem.

Resistance training may assist prevention and management of type 2 diabetes by decreasing visceral fat, reducing HbA1c, increasing the density of glucose transporter type 4, and improving insulin sensitivity. Resistance training may enhance cardiovascular health, by reducing resting blood pressure, decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, and increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Resistance training may promote bone development, with studies showing 1% to 3% increase in bone mineral density. Resistance training may be effective for reducing low back pain and easing discomfort associated with arthritis and fibromyalgia and has been shown to reverse specific aging factors in skeletal muscle.

Peristaltic pulse dynamic compression of the lower extremity enhances flexibility

Peristaltic pulse dynamic compression of the lower extremity enhances flexibility

This study investigated the effects of peristaltic pulse dynamic compression (PPDC) on range-of-motion (ROM) changes in forward splits. Serious stretching usually involves discomfort and large time investments. Tissue structural changes and stretch tolerance have heretofore been considered the primary mechanisms of enhanced ROM. The PPDC treatment was computer controlled. Circumferential and segmented inflation pressures were induced by feet to hip leggings.

Nine subjects, experienced in stretching and a forward split position, volunteered. The subjects were familiarized with the protocol and randomly assigned to an initial condition: experimental (PPDC), or control (CONT). The study involved a crossover design. Second conditions were tested within 1-5 days. All tests were 2 trials of right and left forward splits. Split flexibility was assessed by measuring the height of the anterior superior iliac spine of the rear leg from the floor. Pelvic posture was controlled by rear leg position. The PPDC treatment was 15 minutes of seated PPDC.

The control condition was the same except that leggings were not inflated. Pressures of 5 cells in the leggings were set at factory defaults, 70 mm Hg sequentially. Difference score results indicated statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) differences by condition and the condition by leg interaction. The rapid acute changes in ROM (PPDC: right 25.3%, left 33.3%; CONT: right 12.2%, left 1.0%) support the premise that changes in ROM were dependent on mechanisms other than tissue structural changes and/or stretch tolerance. PPDC provides a means of rapidly enhancing acute ROM requiring less discomfort and time.

Dynamic Compression Enhances Pressure-to-Pain Threshold in Elite Athlete Recovery: Exploratory Study

Dynamic Compression Enhances Pressure-to-Pain Threshold in Elite Athlete Recovery: Exploratory Study

Athlete recovery-adaptation is crucial to the progress and performance of highly trained athletes. The purpose of this study was to assess peristaltic pulse dynamic compression (PPDC) in reducing short-term pressure-to-pain threshold (PPT) among Olympic Training Center athletes after morning training.

Muscular tenderness and stiffness are common symptoms of fatigue and exercise-induced muscle microtrauma and edema. Twenty-four highly trained athletes (men = 12 and women = 12) volunteered to participate in this study. The athletes were randomly assigned to experimental (n = 12) and control (n = 12) groups. Pressure-to-pain threshold measurements were conducted with a manual algometer on 3 lower extremity muscles.

Experimental group athletes underwent PPDC on both legs through computer-controlled circumferential inflated leggings that used a peristaltic-like pressure pattern from feet to groin. Pressures in each cell were set to factory defaults. Treatment time was 15 minutes. The control group performed the same procedures except that the inflation pump to the leggings was off. The experimental timeline included a morning training session, followed by a PPT pretest, treatment application (PPDC or control), an immediate post-test (PPT), and a delayed post-test (PPT) after the afternoon practice session.

Difference score results showed that the experimental group’s PPT threshold improved after PPDC treatment immediately and persisted the remainder of the day after afternoon practice. The control group showed no statistical change. We conclude that PPDC is a promising means of accelerating and enhancing recovery after the normal aggressive training that occurs in Olympic and aspiring Olympic athletes.

MICHAEL JORDAN AND CRYOTHERAPY

MICHAEL JORDAN AND CRYOTHERAPY

Michael Jordan and cryotherapy have become a discussion in the sports world. The Last Dance on Netflix and ESPN showcases how the 1997-1998 Chicago Bulls dynasty changed basketball forever. But the Bulls’ legacy was not built on the Triangle Offense alone. The documentary revealed how important recovery is for an active lifestyle and especially for professional sports.


While very popular in Europe whole body cryotherapy was not a widely used method of recovery in the United States in the late 1990’s. But Michael Jordan did use cryotherapy in the form of ice packs and ice baths. Seeing the Bulls on the sidelines with ice on their knees became a common sighting, and it worked. Players began icing their knees when not playing, and the benefits of reduced swelling showed. The Bulls today use whole body cryotherapy for the same effect. But it is also a benefit that has been shown to reduce athletic inflammation throughout a player’s entire body.¹

Cryotherapy in the NBA today

Ice baths have become a thing of the past, primarily due to cryotherapy. Trainers and players no longer want to sit in tubs of ice water for 20 minutes. Whole Body Cryotherapy is easier and more effective than cold water immersion to treat muscle pain and muscle soreness. The evidence to support the use of cryotherapy in sports is growing and more researchers are studying ways to use cryo beneficially. Some professional coaches overseas have actually gone as far as stating that the lack of cryotherapy can promote injury for athletes.² Zion Williamson uses cryotherapy to help him maintain his edge and dominate the game. An ardent supporter of cryotherapy LeBron James spends over one million dollars per year on his recovery methods.

NBA Pelican’s Zion Williamson in the XR Cryotherapy Chamber
NBA Pelican’s Zion Williamson in the XR Cryotherapy Chamber

Cryotherapy for the Non-Athlete

Non-athletes can use cryotherapy for the same benefits as pro-athletes, and the overall benefits may be greater. Professional athletes are at a higher risk of injury due to their level of sport. But for the common athlete, or just someone who enjoys staying in shape, cryotherapy can have great benefits. This includes a higher metabolism and caloric burn (500-800 calories), reduced capacity to develop painful inflammation, and relief from painful muscles and delayed onset muscle soreness. Many with rheumatoid arthritis have used cryotherapy to help ease the pain as the cold temperatures can decrease inflammation.

Interested in learning more about buying a cryotherapy machine?  Click here to see how easy it is (no email or registration required).

Are you curious about the science behind cryotherapy?  Check out our list of peer-reviewed cryotherapy clinical studies.

Founded on facts: for peer-reviewed articles, scholarly journals, and articles cited above please see the below sources.

  1. Professional tennis players who underwent moderate-intensity training and whole-body cryostimulation after the tournament season displayed a synergistic anti-inflammatory effect. http://media.wix.com/ugd/76b06d_4c8c2b7556506b5b11bc819758c716b7.pdf
  2. The Guardian, July 15, 2020. English Premier League Aston Villa’s manager has publicly voiced his concern that “players will continue to sustain significant injuries because they have been prevented from using cryotherapy to recover.”

NOTICE: Information contained within this website and in all materials, communications, or presentations by Cryo Innovations and Cryo Recovery Lounge is for informational purposes only.  Whole Body Cryotherapy, infrared sauna, hyperbaric chamber, and any and all recovery methods described and/or offered by Cryo Recovery Lounge or Cryo Innovations are neither designed nor advised for treatment or cure of any illness or disease.  No cryotherapy chambers (including the XR) have been tested or approved by the FDA.  Please consult with your medical professional before beginning any cryotherapy or recovery method.  All material contained within this site is copyrighted and may not be reproduced in any form without prior written permission. All rights reserved. For permissions contact Cryo Innovations.

CRYOTHERAPY FOR BACK PAIN

CRYOTHERAPY FOR BACK PAIN

Does cryotherapy work for chronic back pain? According to the Mayo Clinic “Back pain is one of the most common reasons people go to the doctor or miss work, and it is a leading cause of disability worldwide.”¹ Everyone from athletes to stay-at-home Mom’s are at risk of injuring their back. Moreover, most will need a doctor, or worse, invasive surgery. But can regular cryotherapy help? The answer is a resounding yes.

Regular Cryotherapy for Back Pain

Cryotherapy serves two purposes in maintaining your back. Regular appointments help you prevent injuries by identifying inflammation and using cryotherapy to prevent injury before it leaves you bedridden. Regular cryotherapy also keeps you in an anti-inflammation state that can help keep your workouts balanced. Serious back pain can occur from poor body mechanics. Accordingly any of these regular activities can cause pain if done incorrectly:

  • Lifting improperly
  • Carrying grocery bags in only one hand
  • Getting out of a deep carseat too quickly
  • Sneezing too hard while twisting your torso

Having a regular and standing appointment for cryotherapy can provide an extra layer of protection against inflammation. However, it must be consistent to prevent inflammation that can lead to injury.

Cryotherapy And Athletes

Athletes of all types, from Olympians to middle-schoolers, can benefit from regular cryotherapy. Any activities that require vigorous movements or sudden accelerations can sideline an athlete and any future hope of a championship. As a result students who are preparing for scholarship opportunities can protect their hard work with cryotherapy on a regular basis. Professional athletes can improve their overall performance–and prevent painful inflammation–from routine and consistent cryotherapy visits. More and more professional teams are beginning to see cryotherapy as an investment in player longevity. As testament to this fact in 2002 only 31 percent of NFL teams used cryotherapy in a documented study. Today, every NFL team has cryotherapy chambers in their training facilities. This is partially due to the revelations found in the 2002 study.

Famous Athletes Who Relied on Cryotherapy

Michael Jordan: played 15 seasons, won 6 championships

Tom Brady: 6 time Superbowl champion, 9 time Superbowl appearances

Michael Phelps: Has won more Olympic Gold Medals than anyone in Olympic history

Evander Holyfield: 30 year career in Heavyweight boxing.

Each of these athletes relied on cryotherapy to help them maintain their prominence. Furthermore their current levels of health can be traced back to their recovery methods.

Interested in learning more about buying a cryotherapy machine?  Click here to see how easy it is (no email or registration required).

Are you curious about the science behind cryotherapy?  Check out our list of peer-reviewed cryotherapy clinical studies.

Founded on facts: for peer-reviewed articles, scholarly journals, and articles cited above please see the below sources.

NOTICE: Information contained within this website and in all materials, communications, or presentations by Cryo Innovations and Cryo Recovery Lounge is for informational purposes only.  Whole Body Cryotherapy, infrared sauna, hyperbaric chamber, and any and all recovery methods described and/or offered by Cryo Recovery Lounge or Cryo Innovations are neither designed nor advised for treatment or cure of any illness or disease.  No cryotherapy chambers (including the XR) have been tested or approved by the FDA.  Please consult with your medical professional before beginning any cryotherapy or recovery method.  All material contained within this site is copyrighted and may not be reproduced in any form without prior written permission. All rights reserved. For permissions contact Cryo Innovations.